Mercy as lifestyle

Mercy as a lifestyle: Pax Romana Community reflection beyond borders.

Friday August 12th

 

Faith and Deeds (St James 2:14-17 // New International Version (NIV)

14 What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save them? 15 Suppose a brother or a sister is without clothes and daily food. 16 If one of you says to them, “Go in peace; keep warm and well fed,” but does nothing about their physical needs, what good is it? 17 In the same way, faith by itself, if it is not accompanied by action, is dead.

Jubilee audience: On Works of Mercy

JUNE 30th , 2016

     How many times, during these first months of the Jubilee, we have heard talk of the works of mercy! Today the Lord invites us to make a serious examination of conscience. In fact, it is good never to forget that mercy is not an abstract word, but a style of life: a person can be merciful or not merciful; it’s a style of life. I choose to be merciful or I choose not to be merciful. It is one thing to speak of mercy and another to live mercy. Paraphrasing the words of Saint James the Apostle, (cf. 2:14-17), we can say: mercy without works is dead in itself. It is in fact like this! What renders mercy alive is its constant dynamism in going to meet the needs and necessities of all those in spiritual and material hardship. Mercy has eyes to see, ears to listen, hands to resolve…

Input for the community meeting

- ”Paraphrasing the words of St James the Apostle (cf. 2:14-17), we could say: mercy without works is dead within itself.“ 

     Comment: Being full of mercy should result in deeds 

- ”Sometimes we pass by situations of dramatic poverty and it seems that they do not touch us; everything continues as if it were nothing, into an indifference that eventually creates hypocrites and, without our realizing it, leads to a form of spiritual lethargy that numbs the soul and renders life barren.“ 

     Comment: Unless mercy is manifested in works, we will be subject to indifference and lethargy, which means that we fail to meet the others, and do pass by the wounds of those who suffer from poverty